Meet Sigi Moonlight

a youthful East Asian drag king stands with his hands together in front of his chest. He is captured sideways onto the camera. He wears a white shirt with balck waistcoat and black jeans with black sequin detailing. He has a thin moustache and black hair with bleach blonde streak worn in a long side quiff.

We’re very excited that drag king Sigi Moonlight, will be performing at The Kingdom Come: Queer Future Edition in Sheffield next month.

You might remember him from our online discussion with Festival of Debate last year, Drag Beyond the Binary, or if you’re a long term Andro and Eve fan, you might have seen him on our stages in 2018!

Ahead of The Kingdom Come, we caught up with him. As somewhat of a chameleon in the drag scene, we thought we’d dig a bit deeper and find out more about this amazing artist!

1. We first had you perform in Sheffield in 2018. How did you get into drag?

I always used to play the male roles at the all girls’ schools I went to, and that was my first approach to performing masculinity and being on stage. I didn’t perform for a while after that. Even though I loved being on the stage, I never felt any of the castings mirrored my gender or racial identity.

Then in 2017, I saw my first ever drag king, johnsmith, who just happened to be performing in Leeds where I used to live. That was when it clicked. I took part in your king workshop led by Adam All and Apple Derrieres a month later and that’s where Sigi Moonlight was born. Shortly following that I came third in Man Up! drag king competition at The Glory, East London and it swiftly took off from there; it felt like I was meant to have been doing this all along.

an East Asian drag king, Sigi Moonlight strums a small banjo onstage. He wears a red shirt and black trousers and has short black hair with a bleach blonde streak at the front
Sigi Moonlight Performing at The Kingdom Come, 2018

2. Can you tell us about the character of Sigi and how you approach your drag performances?

My drag name is a play on Ziggy Stardust and it’s an expression of everything that’s gone a bit wrong with masculinity. Sigi was born in 2017, the same year that Donald Trump became the POTUS, and to me that spelled the beginning of the end for humanity. Just like Ziggy Stardust, Sigi is a bit of an alien sent to earth, an empty vessel who embodies different types of masculinity in order to shine a light on the weird and terrifying extremes it has reached. My “Siginature” (excuse the pun) style is taking an overtly darkly masculine character and flipping it on its head to reveal a softer, more feminine interior in the form of striptease and comedy.

3. We last caught up with you in a Festival of Debate Q&A in May 2021, what have you been up to since then?

I’ve since joined PECS Drag King Collective, graduated from drama school, got an agent, starred in an HBO series, played on a West End stage, performed in a lead role in Mulan Rouge at The Vaults in Waterloo, and been on a Netflix tour with drag race queens performing at venues across the UK promoting new forms of drag to audiences who’ve never seen a drag king before!

4. You’re part of the Bitten Peach collective. Can you tell us a bit about that, and what you enjoy about performing with them?

The Bitten Peach is the UK’s only Queer Pan-Asian Performer Collective aiming to address the balance of Asian performers on lineups in cabaret and live performance spaces as well as showcase the excellence of Asian talent on the drag and cabaret scene. I have performed in as well as hosted shows with them since they were formed in 2019.

The best thing about performing with The Bitten Peach is the strong sense of community and identity that is served up to make each and every show really special and heartfelt. It doesn’t just feel like any old “gig”; everyone is committed to performing and preparing well, and the spirit in our rehearsals and final shows is very apparent. I also love our outside social occasions like hot pot dinners and sports day events. It feels like being part of one big loving family! I’ll next be appearing in The Bitten Peach Halloween Whodunnit Show on Wednesday 19th October at The Pleasance Theatre in Islington… keep an eye on their socials for tickets!

Drag King Sigi Moonlight, a slim East Asian masc guy is pictured bearing his teeth in a fierce grimmace. He wears a white shirt with royal blue satin waist corset and dark blue brocade jacket with gold embellishments including spiked studs on the right shoulder. He also wears grey brocade trousers and dark round sunglasses. His hair is black with a white streak and styled into a side quiff.
Sigi Moonlight, who loves a 1950’s or 1960’s rebel!

5. What or who inspires you either in the world of drag or queer performance or any arts and culture?

I look to the aesthetic styles of the 50s and 60s for many of my own fashion sense, poses and direction in my photoshoots and acts. The film rebels, Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and James Dean, are and will forever be my idols when it comes to style and eschewing the boundaries between masculine and feminine performance onstage and onscreen. In terms of drag artists, I am in awe of the make up talents of Landon Cider, the prop and costume making skills of Oedipussi Rex and Marnie Scarlet, the charisma and voice of LoUis CYfer and Beau Jangles, and the clowning wonders of Fancy Chance. However, I’m also very amazed by the upcoming drag king talent who have emerged the last couple of years.

6. What would you like to see or make happen as part of a hopeful queer future?A mainstream show on a worldwide platform that rivals RuPaul but welcomes and celebrates drag kings. There are more and more talented kings on the scene each year, so I hope it’s only a matter of time before we enter the mainstream.

You can catch Sigi Moonlight along with our amazing line up of drag kings at The Kingdom Come #6 on Thursday 6 October. Grab your tickets now!

Follow Sigi Moonlight on Instagram @sigimoonlight or on Facebook.

A REYT QUEER EXTRAVAGANZA: OUR BIGGEST PARTY EVER!

Five people stand together smiling under a golden sign that days 'reyt queer'. They are all dressed to impress.

We showed Leadmill how to really throw a party this July with our biggest event ever – A Reyt Queer Extravaganza!

An evening packed with lewks, lipsyncing and crazy choreography, our artists and fantastic audience made it a night to remember.

Legendary MC Rikki Beadle-Blair kicked off proceedings in full bridal couture, and served powerful looks and even more powerful laughs throughout the night.

Rikki Beadle-Blair, a black man, stands at the front of the stage with his hands outstretched. He's wearing a classic long white wedding dress and veil
Host Rikki Beadle-Blair stunned in bridal couture

Sheffield’s very own House of Forgeous made their debut bringing style, vogue, attitude and queer joy to the catwalk.

Jaws were seen dropping as South Yorkshire legends Bi Polar, King Confuza, Ivy Alexander, Ditzy O Darlin, Northern powerhouses Val Qaeda, Kaan Ghetto, incredible singer/rapper Meduulla and the unstoppable House of Noir and House of Blaque – stunned with impressive looks, walks and tracks in categories from Turn a Lewk to Queer Kink to Lipsync.

Yvn Noir kept it cool

Overseeing the evening was our judges – Stuart, Claud Cunningham and Heather Paterson who gave 10s across the board to our performers.

Stuart – one of our judges

Tasty vegan cake, merch and a slightly more chilled vibe was found in room 2. There, our audience could take a breather, have a chinwag, meet our fantastic volunteers and try to stop themselves buying all of our badges!

And the whole crowd looked incredible of course – were we ever in any doubt?

We’re so grateful to all of you who came down and made A Reyt Queer Extravaganza our biggest party ever. Getting together in a huge party, seeing the support for the artists and being in a room full of love and joy made the night truly magical!

Party goers enjoyed a dance

And a huge shoutout to our fantastic volunteers (who really are the glue that holds everything together), our incredible audience and to our partners Arts Council England and The Civic, Barnsley – your support made this event possible!

Keen for more? Get tickets to The Kingdom Come #6 NOW!

Fresh Air Zine is Here!

An A5 zine with a cream cover sits on a lilac surface. The cover is covered in a flowing line drawing with blue, lime and yellow fill that seems to depict two abstract figures, flowers and other shapes.Overlaid are the words Fresh Air handdrawn in bold capital letters with blue outline.

Take a breath of… FRESH AIR! We are delighted to launch our new zine, in collaboration with the Society of Explorers!

The Society of Explorers are an art collective of 14-18 year olds based at Site Gallery in Sheffield. We delivered our Gender Awareness Training to the Explorers, to share knowledge on how to celebrate and support people of all genders.

A detail of a double page spread in an A5 zine shows a colourful cartoon titled ‘Kiwi’s gender journey’ in a cute and detailed style
Young People from Site Gallery’s Society of Explorer’s created beautiful content for Fresh Air Zine

The full colour zine is full of the young people’s creative responses and includes poems, cartoons, drawings and recipes that aim to raise awareness of issues faced by the LGBTQ+ community and celebrate queer identity and culture.

Inside you’ll also find gorgeous artwork by artist Luci Pina, who has designed this unique zine. This collection of creative work by the young people will leave you full of queer joy and feeling inspired to make a change.

Artwork by Luci Pina, who was chosen by us and the young people to design Fresh Air zine

Fresh Air zine is offered for FREE because we believe that we should all have access to culture and community.

However, if you are able, we would encourage you to add a donation at checkout. 50% of those donations will be donated to SAYiT Sheffield, who provide support and opportunities for LGBTQ+ young people. The remainder helps support our mission to support LGBTQ+ artists and celebrate queer culture.

Order your copy of Fresh Air zine via our online shop now! 

Our thanks in producing this zine go to Peter and Alfie from Site Gallery. A huge thank you to Luci Pina for her creative vision and hard work, and to all the young people from Society of Explorers who contributed their work.

If you have a group of young people you’d like us to work creatively with, or would like some Gender Awareness Training for your organisation, please feel free to get in touch!

Whats The Cost of An Andro and Eve Event?

A drag performer with a blonde wig stands in the middle of a crowd of people in a bar. They wear a blue sequin micro dress. Everyone in the crowd have their phone camera lights shining and look to the performer smiling.

And why are our General Entry tickets sometimes £20?

We’re here today to tackle the tricky question of money. Not in a ‘here’s a spreadsheet, please enjoy’ kind of way (we know that’s a niche joy), more as a way to be transparent on what it really costs to produce the scale of live events we do, and where that money goes.

It won’t have escaped you that there’s a state inflicted poverty war being waged, and so it could be argued we should be offering all our events for free. Problem with that is, we’d not survive long in a capitalist society, and competition for funding gets more fierce every year, so we need to earn income.

We are a not for profit social enterprise, which means any profits we make, go back into supporting the aims of our organisation, namely to create spaces where queer culture is celebrated, and our community has space to connect with one another. We believe in being transparent about our need to be sustainable aka, we’re in this for the long run.

So lets break this down.

You might be here as a community member trying to work out why our ticket prices seem high compared to other queer cultural offerings in South Yorkshire, or you might be working in the culture sector and here to magpie. Its all good. Read on for the inside goss. . .

A tall, Black dancer with their hair tied back stands posing on a stage with their arms framing their face. They wear black and white hot pants and a mesh black top and black furry boots. Behind them is gold letter bunting spelling out Reyt Queer Do
Jason Andrew voguing at A Reyt Queer Do at Cast, Doncaster 2019.

Our smaller events, like A Reyt Queer Do, cost around £3000 – 4000. That’s just the bare bones. Half of this is on artist and crew fees and their expenses like travel. When we say ‘crew’ we also mean the freelancers who support with production and marketing. A huge amount of time and effort goes into producing our events in a way that is caring and accessible for the team we work with and our community. That prep work needs investment. As does good access. We are committed to ensuring our events are accessible, and we pay people fairly for their skills. Think BSL interpretation, captioning and all the time we put into communicating so that our community knows what access provisions are in place.

What that £3k does not cover are our overheads. Things like insurance, IT, staff wages (we’ve currently got one part time employee) and the associated costs of running a business, like taxes, professional fees and website maintenance. Fun eh?

It’s also important to note we don’t have a venue. So while that helps keeps overheads down, it does mean we spend more on hiring quality venues that are accessible. Some venues have been incredibly supportive in offering us free hire or discounted rates, but at the scale we work, venue and tech is still a significant cost, and Sheffield is not blessed with as many live performance venues as other large cities, so we have to be flexible on the spaces we use.

Shesus and the Sisters perform at Abbeydale Picture House. Three figures dressed as nuns and faux Jesus stand on a stage in front of 350 people
The Kingdom Come with Shesus and the Sisters at Abbeydale Picture House. 2019

So now we come to our larger events like The Kingdom Come, our drag king cabaret. Here, we spend more. Whereas A Reyt Queer Do is for an average audience size of 140 – 170, The Kingdom Come is designed for 300+ people to enjoy. Bigger event, bigger budget. So we’re looking at around £5 – £6k. Again half of this is on artist and crew fees. But even with a sell out, we are not breaking even, because the costs of access, overheads and staff time are not covered by our ticket sales.

an East Asian drag king, Sigi Moonlight strums a small banjo onstage. He wears a red shirt and black trousers and has short black hair with a bleach blonde streak at the front
Sigi Moonlight at The Kingdom Come. 2018

So WHY DO YOU BOTHER we hear you scream at your screen? That’s where funding comes in. When we embarked on this queer culture journey, we quickly worked out that to make this sustainable, our core team would need paying. Can’t pay rent on the feel good factor eh? We know enough of our DIY queer scene herstory to realise burn out is a real and present danger.

It should also be pointed out that in the drag and cabaret scene it is not uncommon for performers to be paid way under the industry rate, or not paid at all. We believe fiercely in the value of drag and cabaret as an art form that pushes boundaries and gives voice to those otherwise marginalised, and its also *the most * entertaining too. The artists making it deserve to be paid fairly! (Don’t get us wrong, DIY scenes run by a committed team and serious amounts of volunteered time are wonderful and have produced some amazing culture, but that has become increasingly challenging in this neoliberal climate we live in).

So in order to support staff wages, and freelancers, we apply for grant funding and generate income through other means, like our merch, commissions and bookable training and workshops which includes our Gender Awareness Training and Gender Exploration Workshop. This supports the rest of our programme delivery. But without the grant funding, we could not produce the programmes of creative activity like the live performance events and workshops that we do.

A screenshot of a zoom window screen showing about 16 people smiling while holding up their finished felt faces, 2D felt portraits designed by Seleena Laverne Daye, a Black artist who holds up her sample portrait on the screen too
Through the pandemic we continued to offer creative activities online.

So why is it still sometimes £20 for a General Entry ticket if you’ve got grant funding?

With Arts Council, we have to have at least 30% match funding for a programme of activity. So if a programme costs £30,000, we need to demonstrate we have got £9k of other income. That could be in the form of other grant funding, commission fees or ticket sales. So ticket sales still make up a vital part of our income stream.

We also believe in the quality and uniqueness of our work. Compared to larger subsidised theatre, or the commercial drag sector, our tickets are still competitively priced. We are also unique in offering a clear and consistent Sliding Scale Ticket pricing system in place to support those on lower incomes to attend our events. We got this idea from Leeds Queer Film Fest and SQIFF, and this system has been in place for our events since 2017. It also enables us to give free tickets for refugees and people seeking asylum. Currently we do this though our friends at Lesbian Asylum Support Sheffield.

Solidarity Tickets were our own invention, and they are a way for those who can afford to, to ‘pay it forward’ and contribute directly to our ticket fund. This is ring-fenced money that directly supports the provision of cheaper and free tickets at our events. If you can afford to, we very much encourage you to buy one of these tickets.

It’s also worth noting, that we have been successful in getting funding to support free programmes of activity, like Joyful Noise zine in 2021, and there’ll always be parts of our creative programmes of workshops and events that are free for people to access, like the current Feeling Fabulous follow on workshops this July.

Our Feeling Fabulous Workshops in June 2022 with Ghetto Fabulous – Image Emma Bentley Fox

Our current programme is our most ambitious to date, and A Reyt Queer Extravaganza at The Leadmill, is our biggest ever event, with 20+ artists performing, (compared to 5 – 7 at our usual cabaret events). We have also been working in partnership with Ghetto Fabulous to produce and programme this event, which has needed proper time and investment. So our budget is reflective of the scale and ambition.

We’re here to demonstrate the value of queer culture to our LGBTQ+ community and beyond, and implement best practice when it comes to accessibility and equity in our working models. We know this is the harder way, but the payoff in terms of wellbeing for our community and those we work with, is worth the investment.

So next time someone says ‘why are Andro and Eve’s tickets £X’, feel free to signpost them to this blog. We here, we’re queer, and making space for long term investment in our community. See you at the Extravganza on 30 July!

House of Blaque will be performing at A Reyt Queer Extravaganza on 30 July

A Reyt Queer Do: Back with a bang!

A black femme presenting person with blue Afro hair wears a black PVC mini dress and smiles on a mix in front of a crowd of people. She is lit by purple lighting.

On the 12th June we produced our first live cabaret event in 2.5 years at Sidney and Matilda with our 6th Reyt Queer Do. The night was full of great music, cake and stunning looks from both the acts and audience.

A Reyt Queer Do #6 at Sidney and Matilda. Supported using funding from Arts Council England.

Hosted by Sadie Sinner, with performances by cabaret star RhyssPieces and a host of Yorkshire talent including drag queen Ditzy O Darlin, poet Audrey Violet, singer Jordan Meriel, singer songwriter, Laura Hegarty and drag king Raymond Petty, the venue was filled with queer cheer. The audience did not disappoint, as they also brought the energy with singing, dancing and general enthusiasm.

Our raffle was back too, with 1st place winning a hamper of queer goodies and treats, and 2nd place winning a gift box from Beer Central. The proceedings went towards the Pay It Forward ticket fund, enabling us to provide those on low incomes and refugees with free or discounted tickets at future events.

RhyssPieces works the crowd at Sidney and Matilda

We would like to say a huge thank you to the crew and volunteers who helped us to run this event. Thank you to those who bought tickets to support the acts, and to those who bought raffle tickets. A huge thanks to all the performers for showcasing their talent, and to Sidney and Matilda for hosting us.

We’re even more geared up for A Reyt Queer Extravaganza, our collaboration with Ghetto Fabulous, supported by Barnsley Civic in July now!

Here are some more photos all taken by Sophie Okonkwo of our acts and audience….

A caramel skinned drag performer wearing a long auburn wig, heavy makeup and red beaded dress on one side. They are wearing short black hair and a black suit on the other side.
RhyssPieces
A white drag performer kneels in front of the crowd. They are wearing a blue leotard with long sleeves, thigh high black PVC boots and a brown mullet wig.
Drag Queen from Donny, Ditzy O Darlin
Jordan Meriel and Leo our BSL interpreter
A group of 7 performers, joined by the co-founder of Andro and Eve (bottom left, wearing pink).

Open Call – Digital Film Commission

a pink square has the words Open Call i white text overlaid on two jaunty indigo rectangles. The background has a dotty texture fading to a deeper pinky purple with a wonky turquoise border at the bottom.

We’re very excited to launch an open call to find an artist to create a digital film on the theme of ‘Delight’. 

Queerness is something that an individual experiences in their own way. What delights you as a LGBTQ+ person? What delightful experiences would you want to convey to other LGBTQ+ people? What sensory delights have meaning for you? 

Many LGBTQ+ people have suffered from disconnection through the pandemic. Finding and feeling delight can be healing. Many of us are still unable to be physically together, and this commission is intended to bring delight to LGBTQ+ people who are still isolated as well as the wider community.  

We imagine that this short film will primarily be shared via technologies like mobiles and tablets, but we also intend on it being displayed in a physical location or locations later in 2022. We want to ensure the film is accessible, and can support you to make sure it is accessible to deaf people and people with sensory processing issues.

We use the term ‘artist’ to encompass people working in illustration, animation, moving image, and a myriad of other mediums. As long as you can produce something to be experienced digitally then this opportunity is for you. 

This commission is aimed at emerging or mid – career artists identifying as LGBTQIA and is open to artists based in the Midlands or North of England only. 

Commission: 5 days at £250 – £1250.00

Materials or equipment costs covered up to £100 

Timeframe: Final film to be completed by 20 September. 

To apply for this opportunity please send us an email to [email protected]

Please include

  1. Your name and pronouns
  2. Where you are based. 
  3. Your social media and / or link to website
  4. Links to 2-3 previous examples of your work. 
  5. 100 – 200 words about what ideas you’d like to develop for this commission; responding to the theme of ‘delight’
  6. A brief artist biography

If you have any questions about this opportunity please don’t hesitate to drop us a line. FAQ’s will be posted here as they emerge.

As well as supporting a wide range of artists, our team have lived experiences that enable them to support inclusive practices. We particularly encourage submissions from those currently under-represented within the UK arts sector, including those of Black, Asian or other Global Majority ethnicities, those who have faced socio – economic barriers, those who identify as LGBTQI+ and those who are disabled or neurodiverse.

Deadline for submissions 9am Friday 22 July.

FAQ’s

How long should the final film be?

We do not expect the film to be any longer than 7 minutes, and anything between 3 – 7 minutes is what we’re expecting. We’re happy to discuss this further with the artist we commission.

I am based outside of the North of England or the Midlands, can I apply?

Sadly not. This opportunity is only open to creative people and artists based in these regions, in order that we fulfil our mission to celebrate and represent LGBTQ+ people in the region in which we are based.

Open mic slots available!

A white drag king, Sveto Slava wears a white suit and open necked white shirt. He is a white drag king with has shoulder length brown hair. On his forehead a giant eye is painted and he stands on a warmly lit stage with his hands either side of the top of his head.

We’re reyt chuffed to be providing some open mic slots for emerging acts at A Reyt Queer Do 6 on Sunday 12 June. This queer cabaret event, is our belated 5th birthday celebration, and is at Sidney and Matilda in Sheffield city centre. 

This event, hosted by scene legend, Sadie Sinner is about platforming emerging queer performance talent. Whether you’re a new act, or you have new work you want to test out in front of a friendly live audience, we’d love to hear from you.

Drag, comedy, clowning, queerlesque, song, anything goes, as long as it will entertain. In return for you performing one 3 – 5 minute act we’ll provide refreshments and up to £50 to reimburse any expenses. You’ll also receive a few photos of you performing shot by a professional photographer. We just need you to be available from 3.30pm on the day of the event.

To apply for one of our open mic slots, please send us

  • The name of your act
  • Where you are based
  • How much experience you have (no experience is fine, but its good to know)
  • Your act’s tagline ( if you have one)
  • Your act’s bio – this is more relevant for drag, but it should give us an idea of your stage persona, and what’s important to them.
  • A 2 – 5 minute video showing us an extract of your act or performance. If there is already a video online of you performing this act somewhere, you can send us the link.

We understand the pandemic means you might not have had any performance opportunities before, so if the video is you sharing your talents at home, thats fine! We’re just looking for people who will entertain our crowd. More information on the access provisions in the venue can be found here.

Send the above info to [email protected]

Deadline to apply: 10am Wednesday 1st June. Priority for slots will go to those based in Yorkshire. We look forward to hearing from you! If you have any questions please drop us a line.

Maz Hedgehog performs at A Reyt Queer Do 5, 2019

New Freelance Opportunities!

A Black femme presenting person with braids wearing an off the shoulder top is speaking into a microphone held by drag king Luke Warm. Luke, immersed in the audience of a cabaret is lit by pink lighting and he has short blonde hair and moustache and wears a colourful patterned suit

We’re delighted to share news of two exciting new roles for Andro and Eve!

We are looking to recruit both a Freelance Producer and Freelance Marketing and Communications Assistant who are familiar with South Yorkshire and the North of England. 

We have secured funding from Arts Council England and match funding from The Civic, Barnsley, and the University of Sheffield. This is supporting a programme of arts and culture activity happening in Sheffield and South Yorkshire between May – October 2022. 

This encompasses online drag king workshops, queer dance and movement workshops, two cabaret events, and a large scale mixed performance event featuring LGBTQ+ artists from across the North of England. The latter is a collaboration with Manchester’s Ghetto Fabulous.  Further details about our current programme can be found on our website and in this blog.

Freelance Producer Role

Andro and Eve is looking to work with a Producer on a freelance basis with a strong set of skills and experiences and a commitment to care centered working practices.

We use the term ‘producer’ to mean someone who makes things happen. In other industries, they are often referred to as project managers, or coordinators. This role will assist with the work of programme production, which includes monitoring, evaluation and some marketing. The Freelance Producer will support with all production activities across the programme outlined above, and some related to the general activities of the organisation. 

This freelance role is designed to both increase the capacity of Andro and Eve to deliver our programme and to give someone with producing or project management experience the opportunity to develop specialist knowledge and further understanding of a community focused arts organisation.

  • Contract – Freelance
  • Fee – £210 per day x 15 days
  • Benefits – Accessibility Training given
  • Contract Period – Between 18 Jul – 6 November 2022

If you like making live events happen, bringing people together and are committed to working in ways that are equitable and prioritise care, then this opportunity could be for you.

Freelance Marketing and Communications Assistant Role

Andro and Eve is looking to work with a Marketing Assistant on a freelance basis who is familiar with South Yorkshire and the North of England, with an enthusiasm for and skills in marketing. 

The freelance Marketing and Communications Assistant will support with all marketing, outreach and communications activities across the programme outlined above, and those related to the general activities of the organisation. This role is designed to give someone with some marketing experience the opportunity to develop specialist skills and knowledge.

  • Contract – Freelance
  • Fee – £130 per day x 12 days
  • Benefits – Accessibility Training given
  • Contract period – Between 12 July – 31 October 2022

If you love social media, sharing a message with a wider audience, and connecting people and communities, then this opportunity could be for you.

As well as supporting a wide range of artists, our team have lived experiences that enable them to support inclusive practices. We particularly encourage applications from those currently under-represented within the UK arts sector, including those of Black, Asian or other Global Majority ethnicities, those who have faced socio – economic barriers, those who identify as LGBTQI+ and those who are disabled or neurodiverse.

To find out more about the roles and apply, please download the relevant job pack. You are welcome to apply for both opportunities if you wish, but please consider the responsibilities of the role and where your skills are best suited. 

Freelance Marketing Assistant Role – Deadline for Applications: 9am Tue 28 June

Freelance Producer Role – Deadline for Applications: 9am Fri 1st July

When applying for either role we also ask you to complete our online Equal Opportunities form. 

We look forward to hearing from you! 

Feeling Fabulous Workshops

A purple two - tone poster with a diagonal colour block effect has the words Feeling Fabulous Workshops in white text in the centre. Some of the purple has a glitter texture. Below are the words Werk a runway, strut, dance and pose!

Werk a runway, strut, dance and pose!

We’re collaborating with Ghetto Fabulous to bring some fabulous queer dance and movement workshops for all levels, to the people of Sheffield.

Feel Fabulous with Ghetto Fabulous. Skimpy clothing not a requirement though!

On three Tuesdays in June, you can join dancers from Ghetto Fabulous to explore queer movement. You will learn to werk a runway, whether you sissy that walk or turn out the trade! Alongside walking you’ll have space to explore finding your own picture perfect poses and style. Use the killa soundtrack to tap into the fierce fabulousness that’s inside of you just screaming to get out.

Wear what ever will make you feel fabulous, just remember you’ll need to be able to dance and move!

If you’re in Sheffield, you’ll need to head to the Montgomery Theatre, where we’ll be taking over the dance studio on the 7th, 14th, and 21st June. If you’re in Barnsley, three sessions will be held on Wednesdays 8th, 15th, 22nd June at The Civic.

These sessions are designed to build the confidence and skills of those new to dance and are open to everyone. You just need to book in advance so we can keep an eye on numbers.

A second block of three workshops will take place on Tuesdays 12, 19, 26 July in Sheffield at the Montgomery Theatre. These extra free sessions are designed to enable participants from the June workshops in both Barnsley and Sheffield to come together and develop their performance skills and form collectives. The collectives will perform together at Andro and Eve’s Reyt Queer Extravaganza, alongside Ghetto Fabulous, and performers from across the North of England, on Saturday 30th July at The Leadmill, Sheffield.

Strike a pose!

Whether you feel super confident about moving your body, or need space to bring you out of your shell, we encourage you to come along to these sessions to meet new members of your queer family, and get inspired and creative. If you attend the June sessions theres no obligation to attend the July workshops, but the July dates are aimed primarily at those who’ve come along to at least one or two of the June sessions.

Need further info? Just drop us a line. We’ll be happy to answer any questions.

You can book for the June Sheffield dates here.

Party Pals – New for 2022!

Four white people, three with long hair and one with a buzz cut stand together posing. The two people in the middle hold up sticks with red paper lips on them to their mouths

Party Pals is a scheme designed to help solo partygoers meet new pals

We’ve listened to our community feedback (thank you to everyone who completed our most recent community survey) and have a new scheme designed to help make our in person events more accessible!

We realise that sometimes, you want to attend an event, but for whatever reason, you’re flying solo but you’d rather have some pals to meet! Thats where our new scheme Party Pals comes in!

Three Black women stand in a huddle in conversation with one holding her hand out
Make some new pals via our Party Pals scheme!

You can get involved by simply completing our Access Form and asking to be part of the Party Pals scheme. Then you’ll need to arrive fairly soon after doors open on the night of the event, and we’ll invite you to join our dedicated Party Pals space so you have the chance to meet other folks. Our friendly volunteers will be on hand to make introductions.

Our newest event A Reyt Queer Do 6 will be our first roll out of this idea, so if you grab tickets for the event, you can complete the access form and get involved! We hope its the start of more connection for our community through our events.

A Reyt Queer Do 6 is on Sunday 12 June!

Speaking of which, A Reyt Queer Do 6 at Sidney and Matilda this June, is going to be a real treat. We’re VERY excited that founder of the Cocoa Butter Club, Sadie Sinner is the host. Find out more and book here!

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